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Breaking bread = Church service?

February 9, 2010

Another bread and butter “proof” text used to show 1st day or Sunday observance in the Bible is Acts 20:7.  In most cases, only verse 7 is quoted and you’ll see why.  Here it is:

7 Now on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul, ready to depart the next day, spoke to them and continued his message until midnight. (NKJV)

7On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Paul spoke to the people and, because he intended to leave the next day, kept on talking until midnight. (NIV)

Many Christians go on to show from that verse that they had a church service, because Paul spoke to them and they broke bread.  Therefore undeniable proof of the Apostles worshiping on Sunday.  Remember, proper interpretation requires looking at the entire context before coming to a conclusion.  So let’s look at the entire context and break down the passage.

Acts 20

1 After the uproar had ceased, Paul called the disciples to himself, embraced them, and departed to go to Macedonia. 2 Now when he had gone over that region and encouraged them with many words, he came to Greece 3 and stayed three months. And when the Jews plotted against him as he was about to sail to Syria, he decided to return through Macedonia. 4 And Sopater of Berea accompanied him to Asia—also Aristarchus and Secundus of the Thessalonians, and Gaius of Derbe, and Timothy, and Tychicus and Trophimus of Asia. 5 These men, going ahead, waited for us at Troas. 6 But we sailed away from Philippi after the Days of Unleavened Bread, and in five days joined them at Troas, where we stayed seven days.

7 Now on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul, ready to depart the next day, spoke to them and continued his message until midnight. 8 There were many lamps in the upper room where they were gathered together. 9 And in a window sat a certain young man named Eutychus, who was sinking into a deep sleep. He was overcome by sleep; and as Paul continued speaking, he fell down from the third story and was taken up dead. 10 But Paul went down, fell on him, and embracing him said, “Do not trouble yourselves, for his life is in him.” 11 Now when he had come up, had broken bread and eaten, and talked a long while, even till daybreak, he departed. 12 And they brought the young man in alive, and they were not a little comforted.

13 Then we went ahead to the ship and sailed to Assos, there intending to take Paul on board; for so he had given orders, intending himself to go on foot.

Summary of Acts 20:1-13

Basically, the first part of the Chapter tells us about Paul and a number of disciples traveling to various parts of Asia (Macedonia, Greece, Syria, Philippi) and eventually settling at Troas for a period of seven days.  At the end of the stay at Troas, Paul and the disciples met on a Saturday night (first day of the week, note: will be expanded on shortly) having an informal gathering, something like the nighttime Bible studies we often have, with last minute instructions from Paul.  During the discourse, a man fell asleep on the window and fell down.  He was thought to be dead, but when Paul came down and saw him, he was alive.  They came up and had a meal together (broke bread) and talked some more til dawn, when Paul had to leave for his travels.

That’s the true meaning of the passage.  No indication it was a regular church service.  Some Christians will object, “but they broke bread, it must have been a communion service”.  I’ll usually reply, if you had no idea what communion was, what would the “breaking of bread” mean to you?  To eat or have a meal right?  Let’s “break” it down.

Does Breaking Bread in the Bible imply a Church Service?

Many Christians who hear the term “Breaking bread” automatically think communion or last supper, because it is often associated with the term.  However, back in the time of the Christ, the term “break bread” was primarily understood as eating a common meal.  You have to take the cultural context into consideration.  They didn’t have sliced bread back then, but big whole loaves, and oftentimes, the crusts got hard.  The only way to eat the bread is to break it up into smaller pieces. That’s where the term comes from.

So in Acts 20, Paul and company were gathered to eat.  I’ll prove it by letting Scripture be its own interpreter.   First lets look at the definition of the word “bread”, as there is contention by some who claim the phrase is used only in a communion type setting.  The Greek word for bread in Acts 20:7 is artos .  Same word used in Luke (9:13 “5 loaves 2 fishes”, 24:30), Acts (2:42, 46, 20:11, 27:35), and many more.  In all those verses, breaking bread involved gathering at a meal.  We obviously need to eat everyday.

The following are other examples of breaking bread, with the first one coming from the same setting in Acts 20:

Acts 20:11
” 11 Now when he had come up, had broken bread and eaten, and talked a long while, even till daybreak, he departed. (NKJV)

Jeremiah 16

7 Nor shall men break bread in mourning for them, to comfort them for the dead; nor shall men give them the cup of consolation to drink for their father or their mother. 8 Also you shall not go into the house of feasting to sit with them, to eat and drink.” (NKJV)

Lamentations 4:4

The tongue of the infant clings To the roof of its mouth for thirst; The young children ask for bread, But no one breaks it for them.

Mark 6

41 And when He had taken the five loaves and the two fish, He looked up to heaven, blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to His disciples to set before them; and the two fish He divided among them all. 42 So they all ate and were filled.

Luke 24

28 Then they drew near to the village where they were going, and He indicated that He would have gone farther. 29 But they constrained Him, saying, “Abide with us, for it is toward evening, and the day is far spent.” And He went in to stay with them.
30 Now it came to pass, as He sat at the table with them, that He took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. 31 Then their eyes were opened and they knew Him; and He vanished from their sight….

35 And they told about the things that had happened on the road, and how He was known to them in the breaking of bread. 36 Now as they said these things, Jesus Himself stood in the midst of them, and said to them, “Peace to you.”…..  41 But while they still did not believe for joy, and marveled, He said to them, “Have you any food here?” 42 So they gave Him a piece of a broiled fish and some honeycomb. 43 And He took it and ate in their presence.

Acts 2

40 And with many other words he testified and exhorted them, saying, “Be saved from this perverse generation.” 41 Then those who gladly received his word were baptized; and that day about three thousand souls were added to them. 42 And they continued steadfastly in the apostles’ doctrine and fellowship, in the breaking of bread, and in prayers. 43 Then fear came upon every soul, and many wonders and signs were done through the apostles. 44 Now all who believed were together, and had all things in common, 45 and sold their possessions and goods, and divided them among all, as anyone had need.  46 So continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, they ate their food with gladness and simplicity of heart,47 praising God and having favor with all the people. And the Lord added to the church daily those who were being saved.

Acts 27

34 Therefore I urge you to take nourishment, for this is for your survival, since not a hair will fall from the head of any of you.” 35 And when he had said these things, he took bread and gave thanks to God in the presence of them all; and when he had broken it he began to eat. 36 Then they were all encouraged, and also took food themselves.

The only time breaking bread was used in context of communion was when Jesus instituted the Lord’s supper:

Mark 14

22 And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them and said, “Take, eat; this is My body.”
23 Then He took the cup, and when He had given thanks He gave it to them, and they all drank from it. (c.f.  Matt 26:26; Luke 22:19)

As we can see above, the majority of the Biblical references to breaking bread defines it as simply eating a meal.  So from looking at the context of Acts 20:7-11, breaking bread = dining together.  How can we be sure?  Because they met during the evening, and must have been having supper together.

Saturday Night Bible Study

Many small groups at my local church meet during the evenings to fellowship and study the Word of God together.  Typically, there are Friday, Saturday, and Sunday night meetings.  Usually before or after the study, they have a meal, as most meetings are around supper time.  The setting in Acts 20:7 sounds like the exact same scenario.  Here are some reasons why we can know it was Saturday night:

1. Verse 8 tells us there were many lamps lit in the upper room.  The New Living Translation has it this way:

8 The upstairs room where we met was lighted with many flickering lamps.

It’s obvious it was a evening/nighttime gathering.  When Christians use this verse to prove Sunday observance, they should be consistent and hold services at night.

2.  The author of Acts, who many believe the same writer of Luke’s gospel, used the Jewish method of keeping time, in which days started at sundown.   Hence the Sabbath is always Friday at sundown to Saturday sundown.  The first day of the week thus is Saturday night (sundown)

3.  It was at someone’s residence, as the upper level/upstairs room indicates.  As seen numerous times throughout the NT, Jesus and Paul worshiped on the Sabbath at typical places of worship, synagogues.

4. Eutychus fell asleep.  Naturally, when it’s late at night you tend to get sleepy.

5. Lastly, the ate and talked until daybreak (v. 11)  Then Paul departed.  Paul, wouldn’t break the Sabbath by beginning a journey on it, that’s why he chose to do it on a Sunday.

Therefore, looking at the overall context, the overwhelming evidence points to the fact that the disciples met for a Saturday night fellowship, just before Paul set out for his continuing journeys in the morning.  The meeting was more of a Bible study and a farewell gathering for Paul and the disciples, rather than a typical church service.  Finally, breaking bread doesn’t imply a communion service, but simply dinner.

🙂

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24 Comments leave one →
  1. Robert Xavier permalink
    February 9, 2010 2:37 pm

    I admit, I too thought “breaking bread” was proof that this was a Church Service, but thanks to your explanation, I agree, breaking bread doesn’t necessarily mean Holy Communion ::)
    and I appreciate that you liberated me from that bias 😉

    I also agree, a whole day consists of a Night then a Day.
    “Evening & Morning were the First Day” – Genesis 1
    All Hallows Eve, All Hallows Day
    Christmas Eve, Christmas Day
    New Years Eve, New Years Day

    Other than those two, I have a few objections…

    1. Sunday Night, not Saturday Night
    2. Eutychus died & was brought back to life
    3. The Apostles met at Synagogue to Evangelize

    …but to keep this short, I’ll stick to the Major Topic.

    Now, breaking bread was not the only reason I thought this was a Church Service.

    Acts 20:7 – In Fragments

    1. Now on the first day of the week,
    2. when the disciples came together to break bread,
    3. Paul, ready to depart the next day,
    4. spoke to them and continued his message until midnight.

    The 1st Fragment tells us WHEN – “Now on the first day of the week,”
    The 2nd Fragment tells us WHO, WHAT & WHY:

    WHO – “when the disciples”
    WHAT – “came together”
    WHY – “to break bread”

    It is from this first half of verse 7, that I get the impression that it was a custom of theirs to meet up on the First Day, for Church Service; 1st Century Style (not our modern sermon style)

    I get this impression because, it was the “Disciples” of Troas, not the traveling Apostles, who “came together to break bread >< on the first day of the week" I believe it is telling us about their custom, of which Paul took part before he left.

    • February 9, 2010 5:33 pm

      Hey Robert,

      Again appreciate your comments, keeps me on my toes.

      I’ll start from the bottom. If you read the first few verses of Acts 20, it mentions that those companions of Paul, went to Troas first:

      4 And Sopater of Berea accompanied him to Asia—also Aristarchus and Secundus of the Thessalonians, and Gaius of Derbe, and Timothy, and Tychicus and Trophimus of Asia. 5 These men, going ahead, waited for us at Troas. 6 But we sailed away from Philippi after the Days of Unleavened Bread, and in five days joined them at Troas, where we stayed seven days.

      Why did they meet? They likely had a Sabbath service, and since Paul was leaving the next day, wanted to spend more time with him before he left. Remember, Paul was travelling all over the place, and it was rare if you ever saw him again. So these people wanted to take it all in. Hence the gathering, and Paul’s willingness to talk all night.

      So again, restating my point, this was a special occasion, in which Paul was the guest, and they likely gathered to dine and hear their last message/instructions from Paul before he left. Highly unlikely it was a church service.

      1. Sunday Night, not Saturday Night

      Are you contradicting yourself? You just agreed with me on the method of tracking days, and then disagree with me on this point??

      Show me then how it is Sunday night. We are using the Jewish method of counting days. 1st day starts at Saturday night. If you have indisputable evidence, I’ll change it.

      2. Eutychus died & was brought back to life

      As far as Eutychus is concerned, it’s a bit vague, but I think the context says that they thought he was dead (Taken up) , and when Paul went down to check on him, they found him alive. That’s my understanding. Or here are some scholarly takes on it:

      F.F. Bruce, of the University of Manchester, in one of his books, wrote the following:

      “Luke remembered the occasion vividly because a young man of the community in Troas, Eutychus by name, was overcome by sleep while Paul was talking and fell down from the third-floor window-ledge where he had been sitting. He was knocked unconscious by the fall and his friends feared that he was dead, but Paul hurried downstairs and embraced him (perhaps applying some form of artificial respiration) and assured the others, to their great relief, that Eutychus was still alive” (p. 340).

      3. The Apostles met at Synagogue to Evangelize

      The apostles did as Jesus did. Also, Paul would often sit down, and listen, and when asked if he had words, would then speak.

  2. Robert Xavier permalink
    February 10, 2010 3:57 am

    3. True, the Apostles did as Jesus did, but Jesus was Pre-Church.

    We can agree Jesus’ mission was to fulfill the Mosaic Covenant & establish the New or “Christian” Covenant. It was His disciples & apostles who took on the mission of growing His Church; and they did that by visiting the Synagogues to preach the word to the Jews first/primarily and to the Gentiles also. The best day to preach the Gospel to the Jews is on the Sabbath, because that is when they regularly gathered to study the scriptures. I know of no verse which show the Christian Church assembling on the Sabbath.

    2. Eutychus Died & Was Brought Back to Life

    9 And in a window sat a certain young man named Eutychus, who was sinking into a deep sleep. He was overcome by sleep; and as Paul continued speaking, he fell down from the THIRD STORY and was taken up DEAD. 10 But Paul went down, fell on him, and embracing him said, “Do not trouble yourselves, for his life is in him.” 11 Now when he had come up, had broken bread and eaten, and talked a long while, even till daybreak, he departed. 12 And they brought the young man in alive, and they were not a little comforted.

    (not a little comforted = very comforted..? not just a little, but a lot..?)

    F.F. Bruce would have us believe his interpretation instead of plain scripture 😦
    A 3rd Story fall, approx. 24 foot fall, for a sleeping man, who does not try to brace his fall, backwards onto perhaps a stone road, can easily be fatal. Besides the verse clearly says “taken up dead” & not “presumed dead”

    1. Sunday, not Saturday

    In truth, I am not convinced of either, but I suspect it was Sunday for a simple reason; though my reason is easily refuted. People of those times usually were up before the Sun & down shortly after sunset. Just as it is now, in modern natural villages. They also met for supper before sundown, because it costs money to burn candles & lamp oil; and I suspect the Church was not very rich.

    Of course verse 8 does say, there were many lamps in the upper room.
    But I wonder if that could mean many vessels of God’s Holy Spirit?
    Many Spirit Filled Christians?

    I agree with your explanation of who was at the Supper & why Paul stayed so long; but Paul did not set off alone. I believe he left with most if not all of those who he came with.

    13 Then WE went ahead to the ship and sailed to Assos, there intending to take Paul on board; for so he had given orders, intending himself to go on foot. 14 And when HE met US at Assos, WE took HIM on board and came to Mitylene.

    Also, I suspect the Apostles did not go to Troas to preach alone, but to strengthen the Church there. I could be wrong, it’s been a long time since I studied Acts. I suspect it was the Church there that met on the First Day, and Paul with his bunch joined them, for the reasons you mentioned above, then left with his men the next day.

    • February 10, 2010 11:18 am

      3. You seem to have a short memory. Recall the facebook thread. I presented you with several texts there, you even agreed. C’mon man.

      2. It’s possible he could have died. It’s uncertain. Or he could have miraculously had his landing softened. Angels do that. Or he could have died and Paul revived him, but if that’s the case, the writer would have mentioned specifics of Paul’s intervention. The fact that it just says Paul fell on him (rushed to his side) leads me to believe he miraculously survived a fall.

      1. How about this, we already discussed Paul and the apostles meeting regularly on Sabbath. Isn’t it likely that since they were already gathered on the Sabbath, to continue meeting til the night, and even till the morning, since it was his last day at Troas? There is no prior evidence of 1st day meetings. The precedent for Sabbath gatherings is already there.

      “Of course verse 8 does say, there were many lamps in the upper room.
      But I wonder if that could mean many vessels of God’s Holy Spirit?
      Many Spirit Filled Christians?”

      Seriously?!?! lol.

      I think it was the same disciples that were travelling with Paul, as well as the narrarator, Luke.

  3. February 10, 2010 12:26 pm

    Robert,

    if you’re interested in real exegesis, just go to my website.

    • February 10, 2010 2:50 pm

      Real misleading?

      • February 10, 2010 6:30 pm

        I challenge you to show how I have done so. I challenge you to interact with ANY of my posts. You haven’t and cannot.

      • February 10, 2010 6:54 pm

        I’m assuming you have more time as a student to research these things, hence your various responses. I don’t have that luxury, but if I were to focus on one, and show you how you’ve avoided or missed points, will that suffice in proving you haven’t been fair in your responses?

      • February 10, 2010 8:04 pm

        If you want to single out one issue, be my guest. However, I will respond if you fail to show what you are attempting to.

        I also would like to point out that you haven’t responded to any (but one which I also replied to) of my arguments. The totality of the evidence presented is important.

        Regarding my time, yes I do have the luxury of research, libraries, access to world-class theologians, and other resources. Taking that into account, take your time in formulating your response.

        In the interim, read my ongoing series “Ignorance is Truly Bliss” for a very surface-level treatment on textual criticism and lexical semantics.

      • February 10, 2010 6:39 pm

        I challenge you to do the same. On EVERY POINT, and not picking and choosing points to suit your needs. Feel free to comment on each post and go through each post.

      • February 10, 2010 7:54 pm

        You can see my replies on my website. You know that. Stop trying to shift the burden of proof.

  4. February 10, 2010 6:38 pm

    I also like where you say “They didn’t have sliced bread back then, but big whole loaves, and oftentimes, the crusts got hard.”

    Jewish bread was made in round cakes about as thick as your thumb. Now this has no bearing on the topic but I just want to know where you got your information. Did you make it up or actually research it?

    • February 10, 2010 6:49 pm

      Yes I’m aware bread is generally round and flat, especially without yeast. Often baked in a pan, and probably got hard easily. My knowledge was from previous lessons, and from a class where we learned how to make communion bread.

  5. Robert Xavier permalink
    February 11, 2010 1:03 am

    To Glenn 🙂

    3. I did..? (”.) …Oops <:) I forgot. I'll have to re-read it… (:P) …Sorry 😉
    Could you link it to me here, just so I can find it easier; if you know where it is..?

    2. I don't know man. "Taken up DEAD" Leads me to believe he died.

    1. Okay, I admit, that argument of mine isn't the strongest <:)
    Just wanted to represent another possibility. Though, I suspect it could be true.
    Still, not an example of proper exegesis on my part 😦

    Okay, I'm off to bed 🙂 Goodnight Guys

    • February 11, 2010 9:59 am

      See the screenshot you posted on my wall.

      • Robert Xavier permalink
        February 11, 2010 2:07 pm

        Oh… (”,) …Cool 🙂 Thanks.
        I was searching all over the place <:)

  6. Robert Xavier permalink
    February 11, 2010 1:08 am

    To Daniel: Could you link the article on your site that is directly related to this topic..? 😉

  7. Robert Xavier permalink
    February 11, 2010 2:06 pm

    Thanks for the Links Daniel 🙂

    I’ll check them out ASAP,
    but any response may be delayed a few days… (:I)

    I have a lot on my Study Plate ::)

  8. Robert Xavier permalink
    February 11, 2010 2:29 pm

    Response to Glenn:

    Regarding Point 3. Apostles went to Synagogues to Evangelize

    “You seem to have a short memory. Recall the facebook thread.
    I presented you with several texts there, you even agreed. C’mon man.”

    Actually, I think there was a misunderstanding here.

    On the screenshot I posted to your wall, I was thanking you for presenting me with Acts 11:26; as it proves there was indeed a Church in Antioch & that the Apostles were there for a whole year.

    My hope was that, if I searched for further mentions of Antioch, that I would find other passages mentioning when the Church met up for Church Services; but I wasn’t agreeing that the presence of a Church in Antioch proves they met on the Sabbath for Church.

    I did agree that Church members did indeed gather at the Synagogues on the Sabbath; but I didn’t specify my understanding of why.

    I believe the reason Church members gathered at the Synagogue on Sabbath, was because they wanted to hear the Apostle evangelize to the Jews; so that they (the Christians) too may hear further words of wisdom & understanding of Scripture from God’s Holy Spirit within Paul.

    This is why I said,
    “I know of no verse which show the Christian Church assembling on the Sabbath.”

    So far, I have 2 pieces of circumstantial proof texts for Sunday Church Service (1 Corinthians 16 & Acts 20) but the rest is for Sabbath Evangelizeing, not Sabbath Christian Church Service.

    • February 11, 2010 2:49 pm

      You do realize, that if the roles were reversed, that you’d be championing the fact that the reason they gathered at Synagogues was because it was a Christian Church Service.

      Going to a synagogue implies a worship service. How much clearer is that. You’re saying evangelizing isn’t part of a “Christian Church”

      Isn’t evangelizing the purpose of a Christian church? Isn’t evangelizing the theme of Christ’s great commission. “Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations” (Matt 28:18-20) C’mon dude, look at the big picture here.

      Tell me then, what constitutes a “Christian Church Service”? So I can find the exact specifications you are looking for. Or is your definition based coincidentally on those 2 verses.

  9. Robert Xavier permalink
    February 12, 2010 3:13 am

    Acts 9 – 1 Then Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest 2 and asked letters from him to the synagogues of Damascus, so that if he found any who were of the Way, whether men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem.

    What is this passage saying..? (”.)

    1. Is Saul asking for the authority to arrest Christians he finds in the Synagogues of Damascus..? But not any Christians he finds outside of the Synagogues of Damascus..?

    2. Os is Saul asking for the authority to arrest any Christian he finds anywhere in Damascus..? Whether in Synagogue or not..?

    This verse doesn’t squarely place Christians in the Synagogues of Damascus, only in Damascus; but as we’ve seen later in Antioch, Christians were known to visit the Synagogue.

    But for what reason..?

    Do Christians gather in the spiritual house of unbelievers to worship the True God..?
    Or do we gather ourselves to the unbelievers to preach the Gospel & show them Jesus..?

    Does the Church Evangelize..? Yes, absolutely.
    Do we go to church (lowercase) to Evangelize..? No, because we’re surrounded by believers.

    We go to church to share, to learn, to strengthen & to Worship God.
    We go to non-believers to evangelize.

    The Scripture supports this in every case in which you’ve quoted:

    Acts 17 – 16 Now while Paul waited for them at Athens, his spirit was provoked within him when he saw that the city was given over to idols. 17 Therefore he reasoned in the synagogue with the Jews and with the Gentile worshipers, and in the marketplace daily with those who happened to be there.

    The Apostle when to the Synagogue to evangelize to the Jews & God fearing Gentiles, and to the marketplace to evangelize to anyone who would listen.

    All this time you have been insistent that the First Church held services on Sabbath. I hope you can find at least 2 vague verses to support that claim; as I have for my claim. Thus far you have only quoted cases of Evangelizing on the Sabbath & Christians gathering to witness the Apostle Evangelizing; which “can” be considered a gathering of the Church, but to witness, not for Church Service.

    What is a Church service..? (”.) I’m not 100% on that, but I’d expect it to include:

    1. Almost only True Believers gathered to Worship the Lord God Jesus Christ.
    2. The Gathering to take place at a True Believer’s place, or neutral place.
    3. Perhaps sharing the Body & Blood of Jesus; but perhaps not every time..?
    4. Perhaps a sermon from the Holy Spirit or from a Church elder..?

    What wouldn’t you expect to find at a First Church service..?
    I’m not 100% on this either, but my best guess excludes:

    1. A place owned or run by Anti-Christians, seeking to arrest Christians. (Synagogue)
    2. A crowed of non-believers debating that Jesus isn’t the Messiah. (Rabbis)
    3. Indifferent people walking by, ignoring the message (Marketplace)

    All that being said, I admit, my scriptural support of church service on the Sabbath is not concrete; but my proposal to move Sabbath service to Saturday Night doesn’t require concrete scriptural backing. It’s just an all inclusive time to gather, without any chance of breaking the Sabbath; and is ideal as Christians would then have the whole Sabbath Day to REST at home as God intended.

    • February 12, 2010 9:34 am

      You’re forgetting the early converts to Christianity were mostly Jews. Jewish Christians naturally would go to the Synagogue to hear the word of God. To disqualify those gatherings by excuses like, they were evangelizing to Jews, is putting extra meaning into it. New converts wouldn’t all of a sudden stop attending. C’mon now.

      I don’t know about your church, but we have “non-believing” visitors at my church all the time. Over time they get baptized, and become members. That’s how churches grow. Sure, we do Bible studies at their homes, but we bring them to church as well. That’s how you make more disciples. “Evangelism” isn’t a crusade series or something or preaching, it encompasses all sort of ministry.

      Those two verses you constantly insist on don’t prove anything. They aren’t even at “church” or regular place of meeting bro. 2 verses, vs. a plethora of examples.

      Please go back to that thread, I provided almost 10 verses I believe so far. I have shown a trend. Like the saying, two (highly doubtful verses for your case) don’t make a trend.

      Like I said before, it’s up to the Holy Spirit to open your eyes and see the bigger picture. I’m not going to argue over semantics and minor technicalities like what a “Christian” church really did. Big picture, there is numerous instances in the Bible of believers gathering on the Sabbath, at a place of worship, hearing the Word of God. It’s that plain.

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